Art Articles

FEATURE: Visual Identification, June 2010

A Photo Curation

When we put out our call for photography for this month’s Bicycle issue, we described the bicycle as a symbol of New Urbanism. It is a part of a self-reliant culture that insists on independence and functionality, one that embraces a city and its often inaccessible ends. The bicycle has been a means for us in New York City to save a precious near-$100 every month in an increasingly unreliant (yet, still, one of the world’s finest) Metro system. It allows us passage between neighborhoods unlinked by train or bus. It unifies places as we rush through, block by block, and witness the changing character of what is around us. Read More

Imagine That, a Science Festival!

Science Works!

The on-screen realization that something improbable has the potential to exist, such as genetically generated dinosaurs roaming around an island or bioluminescent animals not on a far-away planet but Earth itself is what makes going to the movies an experience that validates our wildest imaginations. Science enthuiasts, get ready, the 2010 Imagine Science Film Festival, is coming back to NYC, opening on October 15th, tempting peoples’ imaginations while accurately portraying the foundation of science in new films.

Brooklyn Maize Fields

Food Looped In

[Updated: Now with Photos!] Boerum Hill, Brooklyn used to be a Native American maize field. Our urban sprawl has left no evidence of its existence. We joke that New York neighborhoods are in constant flux, but rarely do we examine the extent of the words, “This neighborhood has changed.” Gowanus artist and resident, Christina Kelly, critiqued and challenged this phrase by planting urban corn gardens in Canarsie and Boerum Hill, namely at the intersection of Smith and Bergen. Christina cites that this particular area was cultivated by the Marechkawick Indians, as mentioned in a 1640 land grant to the Dutch citizen Frederick Lubbersen. The gardens are a nod to the historical resilience of New York City living.

Inner City-The Illuminated Grimoire of Newtown Road

Inner City

I joked about it. I called it Queens Times Square. Every time I told a new friend where I was living there was a predictable moment of hesitation and a laugh. I had found myself a nice little apartment right near 42nd and Broadway, thankfully free of the harsh light and the awful crowd of its eponymous twin.

Inner City – Joker on the Balustrade

Inner City

I pored over the maps, with their codes and symbols as prominent as the streets and buildings. Every inch was measured, it seemed, and everything rippled with information referenced and cross-referenced elsewhere. It was August of 2005, and I lived in New York City. For three months from having arrived out of school, this was my life: study the maps, learn the code, stay inside.

May 2010: The Identity Issue

Our First Born!

Our May Issue is our first, and represents a lot of aspirations for what we hope to achieve as a web publication. While we may support that need for immediacy through our regular columns, our monthly issues and features aim to craft more detailed, emotionally tinged experiences for you, our reader.

FEATURE: Visual Identification

A Photo Curation

A first curation. Photo Editor Lemia Monet Bodden and Senior Editor Jon Michael Anzalone share a selection of photographs that outline their work and identities as photographers.

Hoopla Hooper: Yawen Chen

Photo Life

New York City is a breeding ground for inspiring moments, with its ever-changing landscapes, establishments and inhabitants. Every day in the city, I strive to capture and document these moments, whether it’s through a photo, a Tweet, or a conversation. Here, on my third year as a Brooklyn resident from California, I offer you my visual perspective.

Hoopla Hooper: Jake Alper

Concert Photographer

I’m not a writer so I’m not even going to try. What do I do, if I’m not a writer? I’m the techmonkey that keeps the servers running and the email flowing. I’m also a photographer, specializing in live music photography, typically using natural light and no flash. It can be a lot harder to get clear shots that way, but the end result is almost always so much more interesting, as well as being much less intrusive to the artists! Here are some examples of my work (in the gallery, top right), mostly shot around New York City throughout the past year, plus a couple from Boston where I’m originally from.

Hoopla Hooper: Jon Michael Anzalone

Apocrypha of Jon

Our city has existed for hundreds of years, and it has existed in its recognizable state beginning about 150 years ago. Telling you that it has been subject to waves and waves of immigration is nothing you haven’t heard; to talk about the grand diversity of the place is not to make a remarkable statement. No, what I am interested in is not that overarching narrative of a great city being built up into the sky, but in what has formed its foundations and those secret stories that are buried beneath. There is a great deal of communication that goes unnoticed and slips away unheard. What happens to all of those unheard stories?