Self-Motive Articles

Unicycling

One Wheel Circus

The unicycle has long been a family member of the circus. Though it may have played the funny-looking little sibling to the shining star of the trapeze, everyone from the early to mid-20th century Valla Bertini Troupe to the Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey circus has had unicyclists.

June 2010 Issue: Cycling NYC

Issue Cover

Welcome to our second volume, Hoopla Hoop’s June issue focusing on Cycling in New York City! This month we’re covering what it means to be an active (Bi)Cyclist, how it empowers us as New Yorkers, how it can alienate and how it can connect us together. We have articles covering Unicycling in the city, Bike Polo, planning bike trips with friends and even a photo curation! Keep checking back as the articles are rolled out, and for now enjoy this cover and the “Letter from the Editor”.

Tweed Cycling Fashion

Fashion in Airports

Last Sunday marked the first official Big Apple Tweed — New York City’s inaugural tweed bicycle ride. Cyclists from as far as Harlem and Washington DC came together dressed in their tweed-inspired Sunday best. We met in Grand Army Plaza before embarking on our tour of Park Slope and Fort Greene. The ride culminated with a free buffet brunch at the lovely French-Moroccan bistro Kif.

Bike Culture Summit

Cycling For Life

On May 6th, I attended “Bike Summit NYC 2010″, an event sponsored by the NYC’s month-long bike-centric series of events used to address biking in NYC. I was fashionably 10 minutes late – since I can’t afford nice clothes, tardiness is one way I express my cool sense of style. My experience at the bike summit, however, wasn’t what I expected.

Hoopla Hooper: Rita Kurniawan

Cycling for Life

Biking has become an addiction to me. Before I came to the U.S., biking had never been a part of my life. I was also originally reluctant to bike in the city due to the convoluted traffic. Born and raised in Jakarta, Indonesia— a beautiful country if you didn’t live in the capital—I was accustomed to the unbearable traffic where, crossing the street was a form of “seppuku”— a ritualistic suicide undertaken by Japanese samurais.